https://insideDIO.blog.gov.uk/2016/07/25/100-years-of-firing-at-lulworth-training-area/

100 Years of Firing At Lulworth Training Area

I’m Les Hooper and I’ve been on Lulworth Ranges for 26 years. Initially this was with the military and now it’s as a range manager with Landmarc, who hold the contract from DIO to manage the training estate.

Les Hooper. [Copyright Landmarc, 2016]
Les Hooper. [Copyright Landmarc, 2016]
2016 marks 100 years of gunfire at Lulworth ranges in Dorset in the South West. It all started when the tank was invented by the British in 1916 and Bovington and Lulworth were selected as the main training locations for this significant new weapon.

Mark I 'Male' Tank of 'C' Company that broke down on its way to attack Thiepval on 25 September 1916 during the Battle of the Somme. [© IWM (Q 2486), http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205194947]
Mark I 'Male' Tank of 'C' Company that broke down on its way to attack Thiepval on 25 September 1916 during the Battle of the Somme. [© IWM (Q 2486)]
Lulworth had links with the military way before 1916 and the Yeomanry, or volunteer regiments, had always been frequent visitors to the training area. The towering coastal cliffs east of Lulworth Cove made an ideal ‘stop butt’ for gunnery so a machine gun school was quickly set up for the tank crews to train. Initially, the six pounder gun was fired on Salisbury Plain and at the Royal Navy range of Whale Island but by 1917, the Tank Gunnery School had been established at Lulworth and the sound of gunfire is still being heard 100 years later.

Armoured vehicles in conflict

After the First World War, it was recognised that armoured vehicles would have a major role to play in any future conflict and along with driver and signal training at nearby Bovington Camp, Lulworth grew in importance as the premier place to train in tank gunnery.

The land necessary for training had been leased from the local landowner and with the conversion of the cavalry regiments to tanks and armoured cars, the range became very busy indeed. More land adjoining the original range was acquired in the mid-1930s and training stepped up with the looming clouds of war.

A Crusader II tank in the Western Desert, 2 October 1942. [© IWM (E 17616)]
A Crusader II tank in the Western Desert, 2 October 1942. [© IWM (E 17616)]
During the Second World War, both Lulworth and Bovington were busy turning out trained tank crews on a daily basis to replenish operational regiments and also to keep crews current with all the new armoured vehicles being brought into service.

Centre of Excellence

Lulworth and Bovington have become the centre of excellence for all forms of armoured training and are a world renowned facility.

Army Reservists of the The Royal Wessex Yeomanry (RWxY), the South West's Army Reserve Cavalry Regiment taking part in Challenger 2 main battle tank live firing exercise. [Crown Copyright/MOD2013]
Army Reservists of the The Royal Wessex Yeomanry (RWxY), the South West's Army Reserve Cavalry Regiment taking part in Challenger 2 main battle tank live firing exercise. [Crown Copyright/MOD2013]
Soldiers from across the world can be seen training here in advanced gunnery and as instructors to maintain the level of expertise needed for modern war. Even the Royal Navy trains its sailors on machine guns here.

A Royal Marines .50 calibre machine gun at the Commando Training Centre Royal Marines (CTCRM) Lulworth Camp during a training session. [Crown Copyright/MOD2008]
A Royal Marines .50 calibre machine gun at the Commando Training Centre Royal Marines (CTCRM) Lulworth Camp during a training session. [Crown Copyright/MOD2008]

Influencing new weapon systems

Besides training, the school has always had a big influence on new weapon systems.

The 120mm smooth bore tank gun, which is the possible replacement for the gun on the Challenger 2 tank, being demonstrated at Five Tips Wood, Heath Range Lulworth, by the Armoured Trials and Development Unit. [Crown Copyright/MOD2006]
The 120mm smooth bore tank gun, possible replacement for the gun on the Challenger 2 tank, being demonstrated in 2006 at Five Tips Wood, Heath Range Lulworth, by the Armoured Trials and Development Unit. [Crown Copyright/MOD2006]
Trials are a part of life, from lightweight weapons for Special Forces to new tanks like the Challenger 2, and currently the new 40mm cannon system soon to be deployed on Scout Specialist Vehicles and Ajax as part of Army 2020.

Safety on the Training Estate

Safety is paramount and as systems develop, newer and more sophisticated methods are being used. Sentries with binoculars and range finders gave way to early radar systems operated on the clifftops reporting to a soldier with a large map and pencils, to computerised systems using fibre optic communications. Today we have CCTV cameras with thermal capability using microwave links into a central control ops room manned by both military and Landmarc staff.

The public are allowed to access specific routes for a minimum of 143 days each year. DIO keeps the upcoming programme of planned firing online so the public can always check when they are and aren’t allowed on the range. It’s vital that anyone using the training area understands when it is safe and acceptable to access the range – this video should help explain it.

Ignoring these rules could be very dangerous so please make sure you obey and understand the rules and any signs or flags on the range.

Landmarc commitment

Our Landmarc commitment to Lulworth ranges and the Bovington training area consists of staff to man the radar/operations room, patrols, operation of the control towers for firing, presentation and manufacture of targets, operation of a multi-path railway target system and the maintenance and upkeep of all the buildings, tracks and infrastructure on the training area. It’s a varied role and I really enjoy it.

Soldiers with the Royal Wessex Yeomanry onboard a Challenger 2 main battle tank during a training exercise at Lulworth Cove in Dorset. [Crown Copyright/MOD2013]
Soldiers with the Royal Wessex Yeomanry onboard a Challenger 2 main battle tank during a training exercise at Lulworth Cove in Dorset. [Crown Copyright/MOD2013]

2 comments

  1. Paul Webb

    I am interested in arranging a visit to the standard gauge target railways at Lulworth Ranges, the one with the engine shed and electric locomotives near to Lulworth castle

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    • helenpickering

      Hi Paul,

      This is unlikely to be possible but you can contact the Range Office on 01929 404819.

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